Food Biotechnology


  1. GENERAL
SCHOOL AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
STUDY LEVEL Undergraduate
COURSE CODE FOOD1004 SEMESTER 6th and 8th
COURSE TITLE Food Biotechnology
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES

 

TEACHING HOURS PER WEEK ECTS
Lectures and laboratory course 4 5
COURSE TYPE Specialization
PREREQUISITE COURSE(S):
LANGUAGE (TEACHING AND EXAMS) Greek
THE COURSE IS OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS Yes (in English)
COURSE WEBSITE (URL) https://eclass.duth.gr/courses/OPE01133/

 

 

  1. TEACHING OUTCOMES
Teaching outcomes
After this course the students will be able to

(i) understand the main principles of Food Biotechnology and the colligation with other courses such as Food Chemistry.

(ii) get the necessary knowledge in order to evaluate the problems of consumers health that Food Biotechnology deals with such as the consumption of genetically modified foods

General capabilities
§  Independent work

§  Literature search, data analysis and synthesis

§  Development of inductive reasoning

 

 

3. COURSE CONTENT

1. Basic principles of Food Biotechnology.
2. Bioreactors.
3. Fermentations.
4. Immobilized enzymes and cells (Part A).
5. Immobilized enzymes and cells (Part B).
6. Genetically Modified Microorganisms – Applications (Part A).
7. Genetically Modified Microorganisms – Applications (Part B) .
8. Bioconversions (Part A).
9. Bioconversions (Part B) .
10. Functional foods
11. Probiotic microorganisms
12. Innovative foods
13. Food and environmental biotechnology

  1. TEACHING AND LEARNING ASSESSMENT METHODS
DELIVERING METHOD In classroom
IT USE §  Power point, videos

§  e-class

 

TEACHING ORGANIZATION Activity Semester workload

 

Lectures 52
Individual written assignments 28
Independent study 45
Course total

(25-hour workload per credit unit)

 

125

STUDENT ASSESSMENT

 

Mid-semester and final written examinations.

 

  1. PROPOSED LITERATURE
Ravishankar Rai V. 2016.  Advances in Food Biotechnology, Wiley-Blackwell.

 

 

Food Packaging


  1. GENERAL
SCHOOL AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
STUDY LEVEL Undergraduate
COURSE CODE FOOD0018 SEMESTER 6th / 8th
COURSE TITLE Food Packaging
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES

 

TEACHING HOURS PER WEEK ECTS
Lectures and laboratory course 5 5
COURSE TYPE Specialization
PREREQUISITE COURSE(S):
LANGUAGE (TEACHING AND EXAMS) Greek
THE COURSE IS OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS Yes (in English)
COURSE WEBSITE (URL) http://www.agro.duth.gr/undergraduate/record/FOOD0018.shtml

 

  1. TEACHING OUTCOMES
Teaching outcomes
After this course the students will be able to:
(a) Understand the importance of packaging in food production, preservation and distribution.
(b) Familiarize with the various packaging materials.(c) Comprehend the methods used to study the interactions between the packaging materials and food content.
General capabilities
§  Independent work

§  Literature search, data analysis and synthesis

§  Development of inductive reasoning

 

 

  1. COURSE CONTENT
-Evolution, Object, Contribution of packaging to food preservation
– Plastic packaging I (production, properties)
– Plastic packaging II (advantages, disadvantages, health issues, environment)
– Metal packaging (production, properties, advantages, disadvantages)
– Glass packaging (production, properties, advantages, disadvantages)
– Paper packaging (production, properties, advantages, disadvantages)
– Aseptic packaging (description, evolution, applications, properties)
– Modified Atmosphere Packaging (definition, development, applications, properties)
– Active and intelligent packaging
– Migration of substances to and from the package materials
– Consumer habits and food packaging
– Food and environmental packaging
– Trends and developments in food packaging

 

  1. TEACHING AND LEARNING ASSESSMENT METHODS
DELIVERING METHOD In classroom
IT USE §  Power point, videos

§  e-class

 

TEACHING ORGANIZATION Activity Semester workload

 

Lectures 39
Laboratory courses 26
Individual written assignments 15
Independent study 45
Course total

(25-hour workload per credit unit)

 

125

STUDENT ASSESSMENT

 

Mid-semester and final written examinations.

 

  1. PROPOSED LITERATURE
§  Food Packaging Technology. R. Coles, D. McDowell, M. Kirwan. Blackwell Publishing.

Food Physical Chemistry


  1. GENERAL
SCHOOL AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
STUDY LEVEL Undergraduate
COURSE CODE FOOD0002 SEMESTER  6th  /8th
COURSE TITLE FOOD PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES

 

TEACHING HOURS PER WEEK ECTS
Lectures and laboratory course 5 5
COURSE TYPE Specialization
PREREQUISITE COURSE(S):
LANGUAGE (TEACHING AND EXAMS) Greek
THE COURSE IS OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS NO
COURSE WEBSITE (URL)

 

  1. TEACHING OUTCOMES
Teaching outcomes
The purpose of the course is to understand the physicochemical properties of foods and to study the effect of the physical and chemical processes applied to foods on their maintenance, safety, and quality. Selected topics in food science are studied and combined with laboratory exercises. On successful completion of the course students will be able to:

  1. Develop an understanding of the breadth and concepts of food physical chemistry.
  2. An appreciation of the role of physical chemistry in the food chemical sciences and engineering.
  3. Develop knowledge concerning physical and chemical interactions in foods in terms of physical and chemical principles applied to food systems.
  4. An understanding of the applications of physical/chemical techniques and instrumentation for the study of foods.
  5. Develop an understanding of basic thermodynamic and kinetic concepts, while the current course serves as an introduction to interfacial phenomena, self-assembly of soft matter, colloidal systems, rheology, and the manifestation of such processes to the properties, processing, microbiology, and bioavailability of foods.
  6. Develop the ability to study Greek and English-language research literature either independently or in collaboration (teamwork).
  7. Develop cooperative work with the instructor, with live guidance, in preparation for work.
  8. Develop the ability and ability to present acquired knowledge to both specialist and non-specialist audiences (oral presentation/teamwork support).
General capabilities
§  Independent work

§  Teamwork

§  Literature search, data analysis, and synthesis

§  Development of inductive reasoning

3. COURSE CONTENT

The course involves the study of:

  1. Water activity, the relationship of water with food safety and quality. Kinetics of food reactions. Application: finding out the expected shelf life of food.
  2. Dispersion Systems – Gels – Foams. Emulsions and their stability.
  3. Chemical thermodynamics. Phase balance. Interfacial tension.
  4. Phase transitions. Glassy transition. Crystallization.
  5. Influence of phase shifts on food quality. Food structure.
  6. Viscosity. Rheological – Mechanical – Food viscoelastic properties.
  7. Porosity. Sucking. Diffusion of small molecules into food. Microencapsulation and controlled release of active substances.
  8. Food dehydration procedures. Freeze-drying.
  9. Food production and packaging processes.
  10. Heat treatment, UHT, HTST, Aseptic packaging, Pasteurization, Sterilization.
  11. New Food Production Processes, Food Extrusion.
  12. Preservation of vitamins in foods.
  13. Osmosis.

 

  1. TEACHING AND LEARNING ASSESSMENT METHODS
DELIVERING METHOD In classroom
IT USE §  Powerpoint, videos

§  e-class

 

TEACHING ORGANIZATION Activity Semester workload

 

Lectures 39
Laboratory courses 26
Teamwork 35
Independent study 25
Course total

(25-hour workload per credit unit)

 

125

STUDENT ASSESSMENT

 

In order to pass this course, each student must complete all of the following compulsory requirements:

  • Laboratory evaluation:

Laboratory experiments and reports, oral and written examination in the lab.

  • Theory evaluation:

Formal examination (mid-semester and final written examinations), a literature review assignment (during the semester).

 

  1. PROPOSED LITERATURE
Introduction to the Physical Chemistry of Foods.   Ritzoulis C.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Applied Economics Statistics


  1. GENERAL
SCHOOL AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
STUDY LEVEL Undergraduate
COURSE CODE ECO0002 SEMESTER 6TH, 8TH
COURSE TITLE APPLIED ECONOMIC STATISTICS
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES

 

TEACHING HOURS PER WEEK ECTS
Lectures and exercises  (3+2) 5
COURSE TYPE Specialization
PREREQUISITE COURSE(S):
LANGUAGE (TEACHING AND EXAMS) Greek
THE COURSE IS OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS Yes (in English)
COURSE WEBSITE (URL)

 

  1. TEACHING OUTCOMES
Teaching outcomes
Upon the completion of the course the students;

·         should become capable of applying statistics to confront problems of economic theory

General capabilities
  • Analytical and Synthetical Thinking

 

  1. COURSE CONTENT
Derived distributions, (x square, t-student, F distribution)

sample distribution statistics,

Estimation, Confidence Interval estimation for mean, two means, variance, proportions.

Hypothesis Testing, Hypothesis Testing,Type I and Type II Errors,Power of a Test, Computing a test statistic,Making a decision about H0, Student t Distribution, Degrees of Freedom

categorical data analysis,

Homogeneity, Independence Test

Goodness of Fit Test (Xsquare, Kolmogorov – Smirnov Tes)t

linear models, OLS Estimation, Hypothesis Testing, Correlation Coefficient, Coefficient of Determinant, Simple Linear Models, Non linear Models

time series analysis

 

  1. TEACHING AND LEARNING ASSESSMENT METHODS
DELIVERING METHOD In classroom
IT USE §  Power point

§  e-class

 

TEACHING ORGANIZATION Activity Semester workload

 

Lectures 39
Exercises 26
Individual study 60
Course total

(25-hour workload per credit unit)

 

125

STUDENT ASSESSMENT

 

Written exams at the end of the semester both on theory and exercises

Two tests are taken within the semester and the average of the grade of those tests is multiplied by 0,3 and is added to the grade of the final test. The precondition for the validity of this bonus is the grade of the final test to be equal or over three. 2. Assignments are delegated to the students that are graded with ranking 0-2. The grade of this assignment is added to the final grade of the semester The precondition for the validity of this bonus is the grade of the final test to be equal or over three

 

 

  1. PROPOSED LITERATURE
§  Koutroumanidis Th., Zafeiriou E., Malesios Ch., Statistics II (in Greek)

§  Manos B. Applied Statistics (in Greek)

§  Batzios Ch.Statiscs in Education of Veterinary Science (in Greek)

 

 

Beekeeping


COURSE OUTLINE

  1. GENERAL
SCHOOL AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
STUDY LEVEL Undergraduate
COURSE CODE AGRON1018 SEMESTER   6th / 8th
COURSE TITLE BEEKEEPING
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES TEACHING HOURS PER WEEK ECTS
Lectures and laboratory course 5 (3+2) 5
COURSE TYPE Core
PREREQUISITE COURSE(S):
LANGUAGE (TEACHING AND EXAMS) Greek
THE COURSE IS OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS NO
COURSE WEBSITE (URL) https://eclass.duth.gr/courses/OPE01211/
  1. TEACHING OUTCOMES
Teaching outcomes
Upon the completion of the course the students will be able to:

  • Understand the basic principles of the biology, ecology and ethology of honey bees.
  • Understand and present the basic beekeeping operations
General capabilities
  •  Independent work
  •  Literature search, data analysis and synthesis
  •  Development of inductive reasoning
  1. COURSE CONTENT
Biology, ecology, morphology, anatomy and systematics of honey bees. Beekeeping Equipment. Honey and Honey Plants. Bee products. Honey Bee pests and diseases (description and control options)
  1. TEACHING AND LEARNING ASSESSMENT METHODS
DELIVERING METHOD In classroom
IT USE
  • Power point, videos
  • e-class

 

TEACHING ORGANIZATION Activity Semester workload
Lectures 39
Laboratory courses 26
Written essay 15
Independent study 45
Course total

(25-hour workload per credit unit)

125
STUDENT ASSESSMENT Written exams at the end of the semester both on theoretical and practical courses.

 PROPOSED LITERATURE

M. Begon, R.W. Howarth & C.R. Townsend 2014. Essentials of Ecology, 4th edition (2014), Wiley.

Supplementary literature sources will be available during the course through e-class.

 

Agricultural Accounting and Estimation


COURSE OUTLINE

 

  1. GENERAL
SCHOOL AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
STUDY LEVEL Undergraduate
COURSE CODE ECO0006 SEMESTER 8th
COURSE TITLE Agricultural Accounting and Estimation
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES

 

TEACHING HOURS PER WEEK ECTS
Lectures and laboratory course 5 5
COURSE TYPE Specialization
PREREQUISITE COURSE(S):
LANGUAGE (TEACHING AND EXAMS) Greek
THE COURSE IS OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS No (in English)
COURSE WEBSITE (URL) http://www.agro.duth.gr/undergraduate/program/ECO0006.shtml

 

  1. TEACHING OUTCOMES
Teaching outcomes
After having completed this course the student is expected to be familiar and able to comprehend:

  • a set of financial statements at a basic level
  • key accounting and estimation concepts
  • accounting analysis of farms and accounting books
  • how profit is measured and assets are valued
  • the different approaches to costing and their implications
  • the difference between income and expenditure budgets and cash budgets
  • the principles of working capital management
General capabilities
  • Independent work
  • Literature search, data analysis and synthesis
  • Development of inductive reasoning

 

  1. COURSE CONTENT
The course deals with issues related to the basic principles and knowledge of Agricultural Accounting and Estimation and discusses the following:

  1. • Basic concepts and definitions
  2. • Accounting methods in agriculture
  3. • Balance Sheets
  4. • Analysis and interpretation of agricultural accounts
  5. • Accounting for agricultural production
  6. • Accounting for agricultural holdings
  7. • Capitalization of expenses and calculation of the value of income
  8. • Rural property valuation methodologies
  9. • Assessment of the value of farm assets
  10. • Estimation of financial results using technical-economic indicators
  11. • Agricultural valuation methodologies
  12. • Agricultural property valuation methodologies
  13. • Assessment of the value of agricultural holdings

 

  1. TEACHING AND LEARNING ASSESSMENT METHODS
DELIVERING METHOD In classroom
IT USE §  Power point, videos

§  e-class

TEACHING ORGANIZATION Activity Semester workload

 

Lectures 39
Laboratory courses 15
Written assignement 15
Independent study 56
Course total

(25-hour workload per credit unit)

 

125

STUDENT ASSESSMENT

 

Written exams at the end of the semester both on theoretical and practical courses.

 

 

  1. PROPOSED LITERATURE
·       Μαρτίκα-Βακιρτζη, Δημητριάδου, “Λογιστική παρακολούθηση τύπων αγροτικών εκμεταλλεύσεων”, Εκδ. Γράφημα, Θεσσαλονίκη, 2007.

·       Κιτσοπανίδης, “Γεωργική Λογιστικήκαι Εκτιμητική” Εκδ. ΖΗΤΗ, Θεσσαλονίκη, 2007.

 

Field Crops (Industrial Crops)


COURSE CONTENT

– Importance of industrial plants – classification – uses
– Cotton – propagation – botanical classification – species
– Cotton – morphophysiological characteristics – adaptability
– Cotton – cultivation practice – products
– Sugar beets – botanical classification – species
– Sugar beets – cultivation practice – products
– Tobacco – propagation – botanical classification – species
– Tobacco – cultivation practice – products
– Sunflower – morphophysiological characteristics – adaptability
– Sunflower – cultivated practice – products
– Flax- cultivation practice – products
– Industrial hemp – cultivation practice – products
– Energy plants – biofuels – trends & perspectives

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
• understand specific technical concepts related to the cultivation of industrial plants (textile, olive, confectionery)
• understand specific problems that arise during the growth and development of the above plants and their solution with the best techniques

TEACHING AND LEARNING EVALUATION METHODS

Use of information technology (power point, video)

The evaluation of the students is done with written exams in the theory of the course at the end of the semester.

RECOMMENDED BIBLIOGRAPHY

Tasopoulou-Papakosta, D. 2008. “Industrial Plants”, SYGCHRONI PAIDEIA Publications, Thessaloniki