Floriculture


COURSE OUTLINE

 

  1. GENERAL
SCHOOL AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
STUDY LEVEL Undergraduate
COURSE CODE Β0033 SEMESTER 5th
COURSE TITLE FLORICULTURE
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES

 

TEACHING HOURS PER WEEK ECTS
Lectures and laboratory course 5 5
COURSE TYPE Core
PREREQUISITE COURSE(S):
LANGUAGE (TEACHING AND EXAMS) Greek
THE COURSE IS OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS
COURSE WEBSITE (URL) https://eclass.duth.gr/courses/OPE01174/

 

  1. TEACHING OUTCOMES
Teaching outcomes
Students obtain specialized knowledge in science and cultivation techniques of the main flowering species produced in Greece, and moreover they become capable of identifying the main flowering species.
General capabilities
§  Independent work

§  Literature search, data analysis and synthesis

§  Development of inductive reasoning

 

COURSE CONTENT

Effect of environmental conditions (light intensity, quality, temperature, moisture, carbon dioxide) on floriculture. Field and greenhouse commercial culture of roses, gladiolus, chrysanthemums, gerberas, lilies, gardenias, azaleas, cyclamens for production of propagation material, cut flowers and pot plants (environmental conditions, propagation, culture techniques, plant growth regulators, harvest, grading, storage, preparation, handling). Postharvest handling and storage of cut flowers and ornamental plants. Fixation of cut flowers and foliage (drying, fixing).

 

  1. TEACHING AND LEARNING ASSESSMENT METHODS
DELIVERING METHOD In classroom
IT USE §  Power point, videos

§  e-class

 

TEACHING ORGANIZATION Activity Semester workload

 

Lectures 39
Assignment 15
Applied exercises 26
Independent study 45
Course total

(25-hour workload per credit unit)

 

125

STUDENT ASSESSMENT

 

Written exams at the end of the semester both on theoretical and practical courses.

 

  1. PROPOSED LITERATURE

More literature sources will be available to the students during the semester.

Population & Quantitative Genetics


Upon the completion of the course the students should have comprehend:

  • Μain principles of Population and Quantitative Genetics
  • The evolutionary process in plant and animal populations, the implications on genetic polymorphism and the inheritance of the quantitative traits.

COURSE CONTENT

The course involves basic principles of Population and Quantitative Genetics, as a link with the applied sciences of Plant and Animal Breeding. More specifically,

Population Genetics: Populations, genetic diversity and differentiation, frequencies of genotypes and alleles, equilibrium population, Hardy Weinberg law, evolution and evolutionary forces, selection, fitness values, mutation, migration and gene flow, inbreeding and inbreeding index, mating systems, populations with finite size, genetic drift, founder effect and genetic bottleneck, structures populations, genetic polymorphism.

Quantitative Genetics: Nature of continuous traits, multi-loci gene inheritance, environmental impact on phenotypic expression of quantitative traits, statistical tools to study quantitative traits, coefficient of heritability and response to selection, genetic correlation between quantitative traits, association of quantitative traits with QTLs.

General Zoology


COURSE OUTLINE

  1. GENERAL
SCHOOL AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
STUDY LEVEL Undergraduate
COURSE CODE Β0042 SEMESTER 1st / 3rd/ 5th
COURSE TITLE GENERAL ZOOLOGY
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES TEACHING HOURS PER WEEK ECTS
Lectures and laboratory course 5 5
COURSE TYPE Core
PREREQUISITE COURSE(S):
LANGUAGE (TEACHING AND EXAMS) Greek
THE COURSE IS OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS Yes (in English)
COURSE WEBSITE (URL) https://eclass.duth.gr/courses/OPE01177/
  1. TEACHING OUTCOMES
Teaching outcomes
Upon the completion of the course the students will be able to:

  • Identify the different Phyla of the Animal Kingdom.
  • Understand the basics of the body structure, anatomy, morphology, physiology and ethology of certain selected Phyla of the Animal Kingdom (Arthropoda, Nematoda, Mollusca, Annelida).
General capabilities
  • Independent work
  • Literature search, data analysis and synthesis
  • Development of inductive reasoning
  1. COURSE CONTENT
The chemical base of life. Animal cell: structure and function. Classification and diagnostic characters of the most important Phyla of the Animal Kingdom.
  1. TEACHING AND LEARNING ASSESSMENT METHODS
DELIVERING METHOD In classroom
IT USE
  • Power point, videos
  • e-class

 

TEACHING ORGANIZATION Activity Semester workload
Lectures 39
Laboratory courses 26
Written essay 15
Independent study 45
Course total

(25-hour workload per credit unit)

125
STUDENT ASSESSMENT Written exams at the end of the semester both on theoretical and practical courses.
  1. PROPOSED LITERATURE
Hickman, Roberts, Keen, Larson, l’Anson, Eisenhour (2013). Integrated Principles of Zoology. McGraw-Hill Higher Education.

 

General & Inorganic Chemistry


  1. GENERAL
SCHOOL AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
STUDY LEVEL Undergraduate
COURSE CODE Β0004 SEMESTER 1st / 3rd /5th
COURSE TITLE GENERAL &INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES

 

TEACHING HOURS PER WEEK ECTS
Lectures and laboratory course 5 5
COURSE TYPE General Background
PREREQUISITE COURSE(S):
LANGUAGE (TEACHING AND EXAMS) Greek
THE COURSE IS OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS NO
COURSE WEBSITE (URL)

 

  1. TEACHING OUTCOMES
Teaching outcomes
The science of chemistry has made a decisive contribution to the development of specialized disciplines such as agricultural chemistry, pharmaceutical chemistry, geochemistry and more. The choice of subjects, the way of teaching and the extent of the deepening of this course are completely oriented and harmonized with the learning objectives of the Department. As a result of the successful completion of the course on the one hand, potential gaps in students’ knowledge from their secondary education will be filled and, more importantly, they will become familiar with new issues concerning fundamental principles of other courses in this department. In particular, in-depth knowledge of the structure and behavior of the material will be acquired either as pure compounds or as solutions. In essence, it is a precursor of knowledge that helps to ensure a smooth transition for first-year students to pursue their scientific specialization in Agriculture. The practical part of the course, which undertakes to initiate and train students on how to operate a laboratory from the most basic issues (safety rules, how to handle reagents) to specialized (qualitative and quantitative analysis), is crucial to the above. In this way, students will be prepared for the multitude of workshops that will follow in the following semesters.

Overall, on successful completion of the course students will be able to:

  • To develop expertise relevant to the professional practice of chemistry relevant to agriculture science.
  • To develop an understanding of the range and chemistry of elements in the periodic table and their compounds.
  • To establish an appreciation of the role of inorganic chemistry in the chemical sciences.
  • To develop an understanding of the role of the agriculturist in measurement and problem solving in inorganic chemistry.
  • To provide an understanding of chemical methods employed for problem solving involving inorganic systems.
  • To provide experience in some scientific methods employed in inorganic chemistry.
  • To develop skills in procedures and instrumental methods applied in analytical and synthetic tasks of inorganic chemistry.
  • To develop skills in the scientific method of planning, developing, conducting, reviewing, and reporting experiments.
  • To develop some understanding of the professional and safety responsibilities residing in working with inorganic systems.
General capabilities
§  Independent work

§  Teamwork

§  Literature search, data analysis, and synthesis

§  Development of inductive reasoning

3. COURSE CONTENT

The course deals with issues related to basic principles and knowledge of the field of Inorganic Chemistry and specifically analyzes and selects the following subjects:

    1. Periodicity and the Chemistry of the Elements, the Atom, the Rutherford and Bohr theory.
    2. The Newest Quantum Mechanics Theory-Molecular orbital theory in simple molecules.
    3. Electronic Structure and Properties of atom-Transition Metal Coordination Chemistry.
    4. Chemical Bond: Ionic and Covalent Bond.
    5. Bonding Models-Ionic bonding in solids
    6. Liquid and Solid State Chemistry.
    7. Solutions.
    8. Chemical thermodynamics (Enthalpy – Free energy – Gibbs equation)-Chemical Kinetics.
    9. Chemical equilibrium.
    10. Acids and Bases.
    11. Ionic equilibrium- (Salts, acids, bases – Precipitates)-Volumetric analysis.
    12. Introduction to coordination number and shape of metal complexes-Ligands and ligand preferences-Metal-ligand bonding theory
    13. Oxidation-Reduction.
  1. TEACHING AND LEARNING ASSESSMENT METHODS
DELIVERING METHOD In classroom
IT USE §  Powerpoint, videos

§  e-class

 

TEACHING ORGANIZATION Activity Semester workload

 

Lectures 39
Laboratory courses 26
Teamwork 35
Independent study 25
Course total

(25-hour workload per credit unit)

 

125

STUDENT ASSESSMENT

 

In order to pass this course, each student must complete all of the following compulsory requirements:

  • Laboratory evaluation:

Laboratory experiments and reports, oral and written examination in the lab.

  • Theory evaluation:

Formal examination (mid-semester and final written examinations).

 

  1. PROPOSED LITERATURE

 

 

Introduction to Computer Science I


  1. GENERAL
SCHOOL AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
STUDY LEVEL Undergraduate
COURSE CODE B0040 SEMESTER 1st, 3d, 5th
COURSE TITLE COMPUTER SCIENCE I

 

INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES

 

TEACHING HOURS PER WEEK ECTS
Lectures and laboratory exercises  (3+2) 5
COURSE TYPE Core/Optional
PREREQUISITE COURSE(S):
LANGUAGE (TEACHING AND EXAMS) Greek
THE COURSE IS OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS Yes (in English)
COURSE WEBSITE (URL)

 

  1. TEACHING OUTCOMES
Teaching outcomes
Upon the completion of the course the students;

  • should become capable of Recognition of computer’s hardware and software.
  • Creation of documents, tables and graphs.
  • Statistical processing at available data.
General capabilities
  • Analytical and Synthetical Thinking
  • Knowledge on Mathematics

 

  1. COURSE CONTENT
Basic principles on computer science, Microsoft Windows operating system, Microsoft Word processing software and Microsoft Excel spreadsheet-application software.

 

  1. TEACHING AND LEARNING ASSESSMENT METHODS
DELIVERING METHOD In classroom
IT USE §  Power point

§  e-class

 

TEACHING ORGANIZATION Activity Semester workload

 

Lectures 39
Exercises 26
Individual study 60
Course total

(25-hour workload per credit unit)

 

125

STUDENT ASSESSMENT

 

Written exams at the end of the semester both on theory and exercises

 

 

  1. PROPOSED LITERATURE
§  7+1: OFFICE XP, ΣΥΛΛΟΓΙΚΟ (in Greek)

§  7+1: WINDOWS 7, OFFICE 2007, ΣΥΛΛΟΓΙΚΟ (in Greek)