Floriculture


COURSE OUTLINE

  1. GENERAL
SCHOOL AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
LEVEL OF STUDIES UNDERGRADUATE – LEVEL 7
COURSE CODE B0033 SEMESTER 5th
COURSE TITLE FLORICULTURE
TEACHING ACTIVITIES TEACHING HOURS PER WEEK ECTS CREDITS
5 5
COURSE TYPE

Background, General Knowledge, Scientific Area, Skill Development

SCIENTIFIC AREA
PREREQUISITES:

 

NO
TEACHING & EXAMINATION LANGUAGE: GREEK
COURSE OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS:
URL COURSE: https://eclass.duth.gr/courses/OPE01174/
  1. LEARNING OUTCOMES
Learning Outcomes
·        Students obtain specialized knowledge in science and cultivation techniques of the main floriculture crops produced in Greece.

·        They become capable of identifying the main flowering species.

General Skills
Autonomous work

Search, analysis and synthesis of data and information, using the necessary technologies

Promoting free, creative and inductive thinking

 

  1. COURSE CONTENT
1.      Environmental conditions in the commercial cultivation of flowering and ornamental species (Intensity, duration and quality of light, Temperature, Relative Humidity, Carbon dioxide).

2.      Commercial outdoor and greenhouse production of rose cut flowers.

3.      Commercial outdoor and greenhouse production of carnation cut flowers.

4.      Commercial outdoor and greenhouse production of chrysanthemum, cut flowers and pot plants.

5.      Commercial outdoor and greenhouse production of gerbera cut flowers.

6.      Commercial outdoor and greenhouse production of gladiolus cut flowers.

7.      Commercial greenhouse production of lily cut flowers.

8.      Commercial outdoor and greenhouse production of gypsophila cut flowers.

9.      Commercial greenhouse production of poinsettia pot plants.

10.   Commercial greenhouse production of gardenia pot plants.

11.   Commercial greenhouse production of azalea pot plants.

12.   Commercial greenhouse production of cyclamen pot plants.

For each floriculture crop the following topics are studied: Origin and distribution. Botanical classification and characteristics. Climate and soil conditions. Propagation. Cultivars. Scheduling. Crop practices and techniques. Harvest. Postharvest treatments.

13.   Preservation treatments of cut flowers and greens.

  1. LEARNING & TEACHING METHODSEVALUATION
TEACHING METHOD Face to face
USE OF INFORMATION & COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY (ICT) Use of ICT in Teaching and Communication with students (PowerPoint, Videos, e-class)
TEACHING ORGANIZATION

 

Activity Workload/semester
Lectures 39
Project 15
Laboratory exercise 26
Study 45
Course total 125
Student Evaluation Student evaluation includes:

·      Written exams (Multiple Choice Test) at the end of the semester both on theoretical and practical courses.

  1. SUGGESTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
Recommended books in the ‘Eudoxus’ system:

·      Book [94692454]: Γενική Ανθοκομία, Δημήτριος Σάββας Λεπτομέρειες

·      Book [77120344]: Ανθοκομία – Καλλιέργεια και Μετασυλλεκτική Διαχείριση Ανθέων και Φυλλωμάτων, Αναστάσιος Δάρρας Λεπτομέρειες

·      Book [1947]: Φυτά Εσωτερικών Χώρων, Γεωργακοπούλου-Βογιατζή Χρ. Λεπτομέρειες

 

Additional literature sources will be available to students during the semester.

 

 

 

 

 

ANNEX OF THE COURSE OUTLINE

 

Alternative ways of examining a course in emergency situations

 

Teacher (full name): Chrysovalantou Antonopoulou
Contact details: cantonop@agro.duth.gr
Supervisors: (1) NO
Evaluation methods: (2) Written examination with distance learning methods, provided that the integrity and reliability of the examination are ensured
Implementation Instructions: (3) The final examination of the course takes place on a scheduled day, according to the examination program of the Department. It is carried out through e-class and MS teams platforms. One day before the exam, the link of the exercise in e-class appears to those who have registered for the course and have taken note and accepted the terms of distance learning.

Students who participate in the examination, firstly must connect to MS teams and show their identity, in order to be identified by the teacher. Each student has to answer 25 multiple choice questions in 20 minutes. Every correct question is scored with 0.4 and there is also a negative score. More details are given with an announcement through e-class.

 

 

 

Population & Quantitative Genetics


Upon the completion of the course the students should have comprehend:

  • Μain principles of Population and Quantitative Genetics
  • The evolutionary process in plant and animal populations, the implications on genetic polymorphism and the inheritance of the quantitative traits.

COURSE CONTENT

The course involves basic principles of Population and Quantitative Genetics, as a link with the applied sciences of Plant and Animal Breeding. More specifically,

Population Genetics: Populations, genetic diversity and differentiation, frequencies of genotypes and alleles, equilibrium population, Hardy Weinberg law, evolution and evolutionary forces, selection, fitness values, mutation, migration and gene flow, inbreeding and inbreeding index, mating systems, populations with finite size, genetic drift, founder effect and genetic bottleneck, structures populations, genetic polymorphism.

Quantitative Genetics: Nature of continuous traits, multi-loci gene inheritance, environmental impact on phenotypic expression of quantitative traits, statistical tools to study quantitative traits, coefficient of heritability and response to selection, genetic correlation between quantitative traits, association of quantitative traits with QTLs.

General & Inorganic Chemistry


  1. GENERAL
SCHOOL AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
STUDY LEVEL Undergraduate
COURSE CODE Β0004 SEMESTER 1st / 3rd /5th
COURSE TITLE GENERAL &INORGANIC CHEMISTRY
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES

 

TEACHING HOURS PER WEEK ECTS
Lectures and laboratory course 5 5
COURSE TYPE General Background
PREREQUISITE COURSE(S):
LANGUAGE (TEACHING AND EXAMS) Greek
THE COURSE IS OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS NO
COURSE WEBSITE (URL)

 

  1. TEACHING OUTCOMES
Teaching outcomes
The science of chemistry has made a decisive contribution to the development of specialized disciplines such as agricultural chemistry, pharmaceutical chemistry, geochemistry and more. The choice of subjects, the way of teaching and the extent of the deepening of this course are completely oriented and harmonized with the learning objectives of the Department. As a result of the successful completion of the course on the one hand, potential gaps in students’ knowledge from their secondary education will be filled and, more importantly, they will become familiar with new issues concerning fundamental principles of other courses in this department. In particular, in-depth knowledge of the structure and behavior of the material will be acquired either as pure compounds or as solutions. In essence, it is a precursor of knowledge that helps to ensure a smooth transition for first-year students to pursue their scientific specialization in Agriculture. The practical part of the course, which undertakes to initiate and train students on how to operate a laboratory from the most basic issues (safety rules, how to handle reagents) to specialized (qualitative and quantitative analysis), is crucial to the above. In this way, students will be prepared for the multitude of workshops that will follow in the following semesters.

Overall, on successful completion of the course students will be able to:

  • To develop expertise relevant to the professional practice of chemistry relevant to agriculture science.
  • To develop an understanding of the range and chemistry of elements in the periodic table and their compounds.
  • To establish an appreciation of the role of inorganic chemistry in the chemical sciences.
  • To develop an understanding of the role of the agriculturist in measurement and problem solving in inorganic chemistry.
  • To provide an understanding of chemical methods employed for problem solving involving inorganic systems.
  • To provide experience in some scientific methods employed in inorganic chemistry.
  • To develop skills in procedures and instrumental methods applied in analytical and synthetic tasks of inorganic chemistry.
  • To develop skills in the scientific method of planning, developing, conducting, reviewing, and reporting experiments.
  • To develop some understanding of the professional and safety responsibilities residing in working with inorganic systems.
General capabilities
§  Independent work

§  Teamwork

§  Literature search, data analysis, and synthesis

§  Development of inductive reasoning

3. COURSE CONTENT

The course deals with issues related to basic principles and knowledge of the field of Inorganic Chemistry and specifically analyzes and selects the following subjects:

    1. Periodicity and the Chemistry of the Elements, the Atom, the Rutherford and Bohr theory.
    2. The Newest Quantum Mechanics Theory-Molecular orbital theory in simple molecules.
    3. Electronic Structure and Properties of atom-Transition Metal Coordination Chemistry.
    4. Chemical Bond: Ionic and Covalent Bond.
    5. Bonding Models-Ionic bonding in solids
    6. Liquid and Solid State Chemistry.
    7. Solutions.
    8. Chemical thermodynamics (Enthalpy – Free energy – Gibbs equation)-Chemical Kinetics.
    9. Chemical equilibrium.
    10. Acids and Bases.
    11. Ionic equilibrium- (Salts, acids, bases – Precipitates)-Volumetric analysis.
    12. Introduction to coordination number and shape of metal complexes-Ligands and ligand preferences-Metal-ligand bonding theory
    13. Oxidation-Reduction.
  1. TEACHING AND LEARNING ASSESSMENT METHODS
DELIVERING METHOD In classroom
IT USE §  Powerpoint, videos

§  e-class

 

TEACHING ORGANIZATION Activity Semester workload

 

Lectures 39
Laboratory courses 26
Teamwork 35
Independent study 25
Course total

(25-hour workload per credit unit)

 

125

STUDENT ASSESSMENT

 

In order to pass this course, each student must complete all of the following compulsory requirements:

  • Laboratory evaluation:

Laboratory experiments and reports, oral and written examination in the lab.

  • Theory evaluation:

Formal examination (mid-semester and final written examinations).

 

  1. PROPOSED LITERATURE

 

 

Introduction to Computer Science I


COURSE OUTLINE

  1. GENERAL
SCHOOL AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
LEVEL OF STUDIES 7
COURSE CODE B0040 SEMESTER 1st, 3d, 5th
COURSE TITLE INTRODUTION IN COMPUTER SCIENCE I
TEACHING ACTIVITIES
If the ECTS Credits are distributed in distinct parts of the course e.g. lectures, labs etc. If the ECTS Credits are awarded to the whole course, then please indicate the teaching hours per week and the corresponding ECTS Credits.
TEACHING HOURS PER WEEK ECTS CREDITS
Lectures and exercises  (3+2) 5
     
     
Please, add lines if necessary. Teaching methods and organization of the course are described in section 4.    
COURSE TYPE

Background, General Knowledge, Scientific Area, Skill Development

Core/Optional
PREREQUISITES:

 

TEACHING & EXAMINATION LANGUAGE: Greek
COURSE OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS: No
COURSE URL: https://eclass.duth.gr/courses/OPE01209/
  1. LEARNING OUTCOMES
Learning Outcomes
Please describe the learning outcomes of the course: Knowledge, skills and abilities acquired after the successful completion of the course.
Upon the completion of the course the students should become capable of;

·        Recognition of computer’s hardware and software.

·        Creation of documents, tables and graphs.

·        Statistical processing at available data.

General Skills
Name the desirable general skills upon successful completion of the module
Search, analysis and synthesis of data and information,

ICT Use

Adaptation to new situations

Decision making

Autonomous work

Teamwork

Working in an international environment

Working in an interdisciplinary environment

Production of new research ideas

Project design and management

Equity and Inclusion

Respect for the natural environment

Sustainability

Demonstration of social, professional and moral responsibility and sensitivity to gender issues

Critical thinking

Promoting free, creative and inductive reasoning

  • Analytical and Synthetical Thinking

·        Knowledge on Mathematics

  1. COURSE CONTENT
1.       Principles on computer Science

a.       Computing Organization

b.       Networks

c.       Data illustration

d.       Numerical presentation

e.       Calculations with bit. Logical and Numerical

f.        Operating Systems- Windows Operating system

g.       Microsoft Office

h.       Acquaintance with MS Word

i.         Advanced topics on MS Word

j.         Acquaintance with MS Excel

k.       Functions in MS Excel

l.         Charts construction in MS Excel

  1. LEARNING & TEACHING METHODSEVALUATION
TEACHING METHOD
Face to face, Distance learning, etc.
Face to face, Distance Learning
USE OF INFORMATION & COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY (ICT)
Use of ICT in Teaching, in Laboratory Education, in Communication with students
Power Point,

Communication via email and eclass platform

TEACHING ORGANIZATION

The ways and methods of teaching are described in detail.

Lectures, Seminars, Laboratory Exercise, Field Exercise, Bibliographic research & analysis, Tutoring, Internship (Placement), Clinical Exercise, Art Workshop, Interactive learning, Study visits, Study / creation, project, creation, project. Etc.

 

The supervised and unsupervised workload per activity is indicated here, so that total workload per semester complies to ECTS standards.

Activity Workload/semester
Activity Semester workload
   
Lectures 39
Exercises 26
Individual study 60
   
Course total 125
(25-hour workload per credit unit)  
Student Evaluation

Description of the evaluation process

 

Assessment Language, Assessment Methods, Formative or Concluding, Multiple Choice Test, Short Answer Questions, Essay Development Questions, Problem Solving, Written Assignment, Essay / Report, Oral Exam, Presentation in audience, Laboratory Report, Clinical examination of a patient, Artistic interpretation, Other/Others

 

Please indicate all relevant information about the course assessment and how students are informed 

Written exams at the end of the semester both on theory and computer lab

Two tests are taken within the semester and the average of the grade of those tests is multiplied by 0,3 and is added to the grade of the final test. The precondition for the validity of this bonus is the grade of the final test to be equal or over three. 2. Assignments are delegated to the students that are graded with ranking 0-2. The grade of this assignment is added to the final grade of the semester The precondition for the validity of this bonus is the grade of the final test to be equal or over three

 

 

  1. SUGGESTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
§  Koutroumanidis Th., Zafeiriou E., Malesios Ch., Statistics II (in Greek)

§  Manos B. Applied Statistics (in Greek)

§  Batzios Ch.Statistics in Education of Veterinary Science (in Greek)

ANNEX OF THE COURSE OUTLINE

 

Alternative ways of examining a course in emergency situations

 

Teacher (full name): Eleni Zafeiriou  
Contact details: ezafeir@agro.duth.gr  
Supervisors: (1) Yes  
Evaluation methods: (2) Oral Exams with distance methods  
Implementation Instructions: (3) The examination will be realized in group of 5 students. The group will change every 20 minutes based on a name list. The exam will be realized via  SKYPE FOR BUSINESS. On the link you will be notified through eclass on your institutional accounts. The connection to the link is possible only through the student institutional account. The camera during the exam should be on. Prior to the examination an identification is needed. Every student should response to 4 questions with each one of the to be graded with 2.5 out of 10.