Food Biochemistry


  1. GENERAL
SCHOOL AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
STUDY LEVEL Undergraduate
COURSE CODE FOOD0006 SEMESTER 7th
COURSE TITLE Food Biochemistry
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES

 

TEACHING HOURS PER WEEK ECTS
Lectures and laboratory course 5 5
COURSE TYPE Specialization
PREREQUISITE COURSE(S):
LANGUAGE (TEACHING AND EXAMS) Greek
THE COURSE IS OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS Yes (in English)
COURSE WEBSITE (URL) https://eclass.duth.gr/courses/OPE01158/

 

 

  1. TEACHING OUTCOMES
Teaching outcomes
After this course the students will be able to understand

(i)the main principles of Food Biochemistry and

(ii) the specific description of important changes and mechanisms that significant products are produced with positive or negative influence in the quality of various animal and vegetable foods.

General capabilities
§  Independent work

§  Literature search, data analysis and synthesis

§  Development of inductive reasoning

 

 

3. COURSE CONTENT

1 Introduction
2. Biochemical changes in meat. (Part A).
3. Biochemical changes in  meat. (Part B).
4. Biochemical changes in  fish.
5. Biochemical changes in fruits and vegetables. (Part A).
6. Biochemical changes in  fruits and vegetables, (Part B).
7. Biochemical changes in  cereals.
8. Biochemical changes in milk. (Part A).
9. Biochemical changes in milk. (Part B).
10. Biochemical changes in processed foods: Beer preparation.
11. Biochemical changes in processed foods: Baking bread.
12. Food spoilage biochemistry
13. Enzymatic browning.

 

  1. TEACHING AND LEARNING ASSESSMENT METHODS
DELIVERING METHOD In classroom
IT USE §  Power point, videos

§  e-class

 

TEACHING ORGANIZATION Activity Semester workload

 

Lectures 39
Laboratory courses 26
Individual written assignments 15
Independent study 45
Course total

(25-hour workload per credit unit)

 

125

STUDENT ASSESSMENT

 

Mid-semester and final written examinations.

 

  1. PROPOSED LITERATURE
Benjamin K. Simpson, Leo M. L. Nollet, Fidel Toldrá,Soottawat Benjakul, Gopinadhan Paliyath,Y. H. Hui. 2012. Food Biochemistry and Food Processing, 2nd Edition. Wiley-Blackwell

 

 

Molecular Plant – Microbe Interactions


  1. GENERAL
FACULTY AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES & FORESTRY
DEPT. AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
    LEVEL OF STUDIES Undergraduate
                   COURSE CODE AGRON1022                       SEMESTER 6th/8th
                COURSE TITLE Molecular Plant Microbe Interactions
INDIVINDUAL TEACHING ACTIVITIES WEEKLY TEACHING HOURS ECTS
Lectures and Exercises 5 5
COURSE TYPE: Specialization Optional
                 PRECONDITION LESSONS: None
                            TUTORIAL LANGUAGE: Greek
LESSON OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS Yes
URL

 

  1. LEARNING RESULTS
Learning Results
The main goal of the course is to provide an overview of the biology of host-microbe interactions at the molecular level.

 

General skills
By the end of the course the students are expected to know the plant disease resistance mechanisms as well as the respective invasion mechanisms used by pathogens at genetic and molecular levels. In addition, they should be able to follow any research development in those fields and comprehend the methods employed in plant breeding cultivars resistant to pathogens via the exploitation of molecules based on the study of plant-microbe interactions.to provide the students with a concise review of the molecular biology of plants and microorganisms like fungi, bacteria and viruses.

 

 

  1. COURSE CONTENT
Introduction– The concept of plant disease: parasitism and symbiosis, Mechanisms of constitutive and induced plant resistance towards microbes, Molecular plant microbe interactions.

Mechanisms of plant resistance– The molecular basis of plant reaction towards invasion by microbes, Detection of plant disease resistance genes, Genetics of plant disease resistance

Recognition process and signaling in host-pathogen systems – Model systems for studying molecular plant-pathogen interactions

Local and systemic plant disease resistance – Plant mechanisms involved in resistance/ susceptibility to pathogens, Molecular mechanisms of systemic acquired resistance (salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene as plant disease resistance inducers)

Plant – virus interactions – Viral virulence factors, proteins and microRNAs involved in plant viral infections

Mechanisms involved in plant bacterial diseases – Bacterial virulence factors involved in plant bacterial diseases, Mechanisms involved in pathogenesis by plant bacteria, Bacterial effectors and secretion mechanisms, Genetics of host specificity

Infection mechanisms in plant – fungi pathosystems – Molecular signal transduction in plant – pathogenic fungi interactions, Genetic analysis of the interactions in the pathosystem between the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the oomycete Hyaloperonospora parasitica

Molecular signal transduction in the interaction between plants and symbiotic microbes – Symbiosis vs defense: two sides of the same coin, Interactions in the symbiosis between legumes and nitrogen fixing bacteria, Interactions between plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, The use of beneficial microbes in agriculture

 

 

  1. INFORMATIVE AND LEARNING EVALUATION METHODS
WAY OF TEACHING In classroom presentations and theoretical exercises
USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES ICT use (power point)
TEACHING ORGANIZATION Activity Amount of activity in Semester
Lectures 39
Exercises 26
Team exercises 35
Individual research 25
Total

(25 hours per credit unit)

 

125

STUDENT EVALUATION

 

Final written exams and optional project at the end of the semester

 

  1. RECOMMENDED BIBLIOGRAPHY
1 Agrios G., «Phytopathology»

2. Watson James, κ.α., «Recombinant DNA»

 

 

 

 

Food Processing


  1. GENERAL
SCHOOL AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
STUDY LEVEL Undergraduate
COURSE CODE  FOOD0008 SEMESTER 7th
COURSE TITLE Food Processing
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES

 

TEACHING HOURS PER WEEK ECTS
Lectures and laboratory course 5 5
COURSE TYPE Specialization
PREREQUISITE COURSE(S):
LANGUAGE (TEACHING AND EXAMS) Greek
THE COURSE IS OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS Yes (in English)
COURSE WEBSITE (URL) https://eclass.duth.gr/courses/OPE01113/

 

 

  1. TEACHING OUTCOMES
Teaching outcomes
Upon the completion of the course the students will be able to:
(a) To understood the needs for food processing and the historical development of methods.
(b) To comprehend the basics of modern methodology and technology involved in food processing.
(c) To distinct the pros and cons of each treatment (cost effect, energy requirements and overall quality) of processed foods.
General capabilities
§  Independent work

§  Literature search, data analysis and synthesis

§  Development of inductive reasoning

 

 

  1. COURSE CONTENT
  • Food heating methods.
  • Effect of heating on microorganisms and food components.
  • Blanching.
  • Pasteurization.
  • Sterilization.
  • Canning.
  • Aseptic processing and packaging.
  • Extrusion.
  • Cold storage.
  • Freezing.
  • Concentration (evaporation, freeze concentration, semipermeable membranes). Food dehydration.
  • Food irradiation.
  • High hydrostatic pressure technology.
  • Fermentation. Preservatives.

 

  1. TEACHING AND LEARNING ASSESSMENT METHODS
DELIVERING METHOD In classroom
IT USE §  Power point, videos

§  e-class

 

TEACHING ORGANIZATION Activity Semester workload

 

Lectures 39
Laboratory courses 26
Individual written assignments 15
Independent study 45
Course total

(25-hour workload per credit unit)

 

125

STUDENT ASSESSMENT

 

Written exams at the end of the semester (multiple- choice).

 

  1. PROPOSED LITERATURE
§  Food Processing Technology – Principles and Practice. P. Fellows. CRC Press.

Food Analysis


COURSE OUTLINE

 

  1. GENERAL
SCHOOL AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
STUDY LEVEL Undergraduate
COURSE CODE FOOD1006 SEMESTER  7th
COURSE TITLE FOOD ANALYSIS
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES

 

TEACHING HOURS PER WEEK ECTS
Lectures and laboratory course 5 5
COURSE TYPE Specialization
PREREQUISITE COURSE(S):
LANGUAGE (TEACHING AND EXAMS) Greek
THE COURSE IS OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS NO
COURSE WEBSITE (URL)

 

  1. TEACHING OUTCOMES
Teaching outcomes
On successful completion of the course students will be able to:

1. To develop expertise relevant to the professional practice of chemistry relevant to agriculture science.

2. To develop an understanding of the range and theories of instrumental methods available in analytical chemistry.

3. To develop knowledge pertaining to the appropriate selection of instruments for the successful analysis of complex mixtures (e.g. foods)

4. To develop an understanding of the role of an agriculturist in measurement and problem solving in food analysis

5. To provide an understanding of and skills in advanced methods of separation and analysis

6. To provide practical experience in selected instrumental methods of food analysis

7. To extend skills in procedures and instrumental methods applied in analytical tasks

8. To expand skills in the scientific method of planning, developing, conducting, reviewing and reporting experiments

9. To extend understanding of the professional and safety responsibilities residing in working on environmental problems

General capabilities
§  Independent work

§  Team work

§  Literature search, data analysis and synthesis

§  Development of inductive reasoning

 

 

  1. COURSE CONTENT
The course involves study of:

  1.    Introduction in Food Analysis
  2.     General Principles of Food Sampling

3.       Determination of Humidity in Foods

4.     Determination of Ash content in Foods

5.      Determination of Lipids in Foods (I)

6.    Determination of Lipids in Foods (II)

7.     Determination  of Sugars in Foods

8.     Determination of Proteins in Foods (I)

9.     Determination of Proteins in Foods (II)

10.   Determination of Vitamins in Foods

11.  Determination of Food Additives

12.  Determination of  Sensorial Characteristics in Foods

13. Determination of Acidity in Foods

 

  1. TEACHING AND LEARNING ASSESSMENT METHODS
DELIVERING METHOD In classroom, Τeleconferance
IT USE §  Power point, videos

§  e-class

 

TEACHING ORGANIZATION Activity Semester workload

 

Lectures 39
Laboratory courses 26
Team work 35
Independent study 25
Course total

(25-hour workload per credit unit)

 

125

STUDENT ASSESSMENT

 

In order to pass this course, each student must complete all of the following compulsory requirements:

·         Laboratory evaluation: laboratory exercises and reports and oral examination in the lab.

·         Formal examination (mid-semester and final written examinations)

 

  1. PROPOSED LITERATURE
 Alihanidou-Polichroniadou