English-French II


  1. GENERAL
SCHOOL AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
STUDY LEVEL Undergraduate
COURSE CODE Β0015 SEMESTER 2nd
COURSE TITLE English II
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES

 

TEACHING HOURS PER WEEK ECTS
Lectures 2 5
COURSE TYPE General Background
PREREQUISITE COURSE(S):
LANGUAGE (TEACHING AND EXAMS) Greek and English
THE COURSE IS OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS NO
COURSE WEBSITE (URL) https://eclass.duth.gr/courses/OPE02208/

 

  1. TEACHING OUTCOMES
Teaching outcomes
Upon successful completion of the course students will be able to:

  • familiarize themselves with different types of scientific reading texts in English so that they can recognize the organizational layout and linguistic structure of articles, reports and experiments.
  • develop the appropriate reading skills and strategies necessary for the adequate comprehension of scientific texts of agricultural interest written in English
  • understand the cohesive links of a particular scientific reading text in English and recognize the internal structure of text on a paragraph and text level
  • be able to develop appropriate contextual lexical guessing strategies that allow them to effectively overcome the issue of unknown vocabulary while reading in English
  • develop and enrich their scientific vocabulary in English that is necessary for reading and writing purposes while referring to agricultural issues.
  • appreciate how agricultural issues are dealt with in on an international scale as viewed in scientific reports that originate from different parts of the world
General capabilities
Upon successful completion of the course students will have developed the following general capabilities:

  • The expansion of students’ academic and specific English vocabulary on scientific issues of Agriculture
  • The development of the ability to analyse the key features of scientific English texts and, subsequently produce academic written language in English by writing a scientific article or a report on Agricultural issues.
  • Research skills development that will allow students to search for relevant literature and use it in the writing of a critical review of a scientific article in English.
  • The development of critical thinking skills and abilities necessary for the preparation and writing of a dissertation in English.
  • The development of  students’  writing skills to avoid plagiarizing and to abide by the APA rules while writing research work in English,
  • The development of their oral skills in English and the adoption of useful presentation strategies that can be used in international conferences and seminars in their area.

 

 

 

  1. COURSE CONTENT
English II covers a range of topics and issues related to the scientific area of Agriculture by focusing on different types of academic texts that are mainly derived from either English-speaking textbooks or from scientific agricultural journals and published minutes of international conferences and seminars. Topics covered in this course include the following:

History of Agriculture

The Plant Kingdom

The Origins of Cultivated Plants

Morphology of Cultivated Plants

Anatomy of Plants

Soil Chemistry and Formation

Soil Classifications and Use

Soil Fertility and Management

Irrigation

Organic Agriculture

Fundamentals of Plant Growth I: Temperature

Fundamentals of Plant Growth II: Light

Fundamentals of Plant Growth III: Photosynthesis

 

  1. TEACHING AND LEARNING ASSESSMENT METHODS
DELIVERING METHOD In classroom
IT USE §  Power point, videos

§  Instructor’s website

 

TEACHING ORGANIZATION Activity Semester workload

 

Lectures 26
Laboratory courses
Team work
Independent study
Course total

(25-hour workload per credit unit)

 

50

STUDENT ASSESSMENT

 

In order to pass this course, each student must complete all a 2-hour final written examination at the end of the semester.

 

  1. PROPOSED LITERATURE
Bateman, H. (2006) Dictionary of Agriculture. A&C Black Publishers.

Beentje, H. (2010) The Kew Plant Glossary: An Illustrated Dictionary of Plant Identification Terms. Royal Botanic Gardens Kew.

Bell, B. (2005) Farm Machinery. Old Pond Publishing Ltd.

Hickey, M. and King, C. (2000) The Cambridge Illustrated Glossary of Botanical Terms. Cambridge: CUP.

Parker, R. (2009) Plant & Soil Science. Delmare Cengage Learning.

Sheaffer, C. et al (2012) Introduction to Agronomy. Food, Crops and Environment. Cengage Learning

USDA-NRCS (2007). The Plants Database.

Vaughan,J. et al (2009) The New Oxford Book of Food Plants. OUP.

 

 

Plant Physiology


COURSE OUTLINE

 

  1. GENERAL
SCHOOL AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
STUDY LEVEL Undergraduate
COURSE CODE B0013 SEMESTER 2nd
COURSE TITLE Plant Physiology
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES

 

TEACHING HOURS PER WEEK ECTS
Lectures and laboratory course 5 5
COURSE TYPE Core
PREREQUISITE COURSE(S):
LANGUAGE (TEACHING AND EXAMS) Greek
THE COURSE IS OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS
COURSE WEBSITE (URL) https://eclass.duth.gr/courses/OPE0117366/

 

  1. TEACHING OUTCOMES
Teaching outcomes
Students obtain basic knowledge on the physiological processes in plants.
General capabilities
§  Independent work

§  Literature search, data analysis and synthesis

§  Development of inductive reasoning

 

COURSE CONTENT

Aspects of the chemical composition of plants. Physiological characteristics of the main organic compounds (lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, nucleic acids). Principles of the metabolism of higher plants (biophysical phenomena, enzymes, enzymic reactions, allosteric enzymes, inhibition, biomembranes). Respiration of higher plants (aerobic and anaerobic respiration. Glycolysis, Krebs cycle, phosphopentose cycle. Respiratory metabolism of lipids and proteins. Control of respiration and the factors affecting it). Material exchange. Inorganic nutrition of higher plants. Necessary nutrients: physiological role, absorption by roots and leaves, translocation in plants. Rules of plant production. Metabolism and symbiotic fixation of nitrogen. Metabolism of other nutrient elements). Photosynthesis (role, photochemical stages, photosystems I and II, CO2 fixation). Trioze metabolism and synthesis of organic compounds. Transpiration. Plant growth and development (vegetative growth, growth pattern). Endogenous growth factors. Plant hormones: chemical composition, physiological role and mode of action. External growth factors. Thermoperiodism. Dormancy. Metabolic stress.

 

  1. TEACHING AND LEARNING ASSESSMENT METHODS
DELIVERING METHOD In classroom
IT USE §  Power point, videos

§  e-class

 

TEACHING ORGANIZATION Activity Semester workload

 

Lectures 39
Assignment 15
Applied exercises 26
Independent study 45
Course total

(25-hour workload per credit unit)

 

125

STUDENT ASSESSMENT

 

Written exams at the end of the semester.

 

 PROPOSED LITERATURE

Βιβλίο [6838]: Φυσιολογία Φυτών, Καράταγλης Στ.

Βιβλίο [41963619]: Φυσιολογία φυτών, Τσέκος Ι.

Βιβλίο [59396732]: Φυσιολογία και Ανάπτυξη των Φυτών, L. Taiz, E. Zeiger, I. M. Møller, A. Murphy

 

 

General Ecology


  1. GENERAL
SCHOOL AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
STUDY LEVEL Undergraduate
COURSE CODE Β0027 SEMESTER   4th
COURSE TITLE GENERAL ECOLOGY
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES TEACHING HOURS PER WEEK ECTS
Lectures and laboratory course 5 5
COURSE TYPE Core
PREREQUISITE COURSE(S):
LANGUAGE (TEACHING AND EXAMS) Greek
THE COURSE IS OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS Yes (in English)
COURSE WEBSITE (URL) https://eclass.duth.gr/courses/OPE01177
  1. TEACHING OUTCOMES
Teaching outcomes
Upon the completion of the course the students will be able to:

1.Understand the basic principles of ecology.

2.Use the main demographic parameters and life table data to describe population dynamics

3.Understand the main interactions between different species and how these may affect the abundance.

General capabilities
  • Independent work
  • Literature search, data analysis and synthesis
  • Development of inductive reasoning
  1. COURSE CONTENT
Introduction to Ecology. Adaptive strategies of organisms. Organisms and abiotic environment. Population dynamics. Interspecific competition. Organism interactions. Predacity. Aquatic ecosystems. The biocommunity and ecosystem concepts. Energy and productivity of ecosystems. Material recycling. Biodiversity.
  1. TEACHING AND LEARNING ASSESSMENT METHODS
DELIVERING METHOD In classroom
IT USE
  • Power point, videos
  • e-class

 

TEACHING ORGANIZATION Activity Semester workload
Lectures 39
Laboratory courses 26
Written essay 15
Independent study 45
Course total

(25-hour workload per credit unit)

125
STUDENT ASSESSMENT Written exams at the end of the semester both on theoretical and practical courses.

 5. PROPOSED LITERATURE

M. Begon, R.W. Howarth & C.R. Townsend 2014. Essentials of Ecology, 4th edition (2014), Wiley.

Supplementary literature sources will be available during the course through e-class.

 

 

Organic Chemistry


  1. GENERAL
SCHOOL AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
STUDY LEVEL Undergraduate
COURSE CODE Β0009 SEMESTER  2nd
COURSE TITLE ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES

 

TEACHING HOURS PER WEEK ECTS
Lectures and laboratory course 5 5
COURSE TYPE Special Background
PREREQUISITE COURSE(S):
LANGUAGE (TEACHING AND EXAMS) Greek
THE COURSE IS OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS NO
COURSE WEBSITE (URL)

 

  1. TEACHING OUTCOMES
Teaching outcomes
Organic Chemistry has made a significant contribution to improving human life and generally holds an important place in the natural sciences. This is because this particular field of Chemistry is the basis of all life sciences but also because organic compounds are a particularly convenient system for applying organic analysis techniques. It has made a decisive contribution to the development of specialized fields such as agricultural chemistry, pharmaceutical chemistry, biochemistry, food chemistry, and more. The choice of subjects, the way of teaching as well as the degree of deepening of the course are completely oriented and harmonized with the learning objectives of the Department and its individual Orientations. Therefore, it is intended, on the one hand, to fill possible gaps in students’ knowledge from their secondary education and, on the other hand, to familiarize them with new issues concerning fundamental principles of other courses in the current Department. The practical part of the course, which as a Second Semester Lab, undertakes to initiate and train students in techniques applied to the isolation, reception, and partial identification of chemicals of biological interest, also contributes decisively to the above. In this way students are prepared for their training in more specialized laboratories to follow in the following semesters or in the Orientations they choose.

On successful completion of the course students will be able to:

  1. Identify and describe the molecular structure of the basic organic molecules and biomolecules, and correlate the structural differences, at the level of electronic, structural, and stereochemical types, with their chemical activity and biochemical behavior.
  2. Recognize and categorize both the final and intermediate products of the basic organic reactions found in the major metabolic pathways.
  3. Identify the factors that affect the stability of the organic molecules and be able to identify and / or predict their modifications at the level of the reaction mechanism depending on the chemical environment and the conditions imposed.
  4. Operate the basic spectroscopic techniques used for the qualitative analysis and characterization of organic compounds.
General capabilities
§  Independent work

§  Teamwork

§  Literature search, data analysis, and synthesis

§  Development of inductive reasoning

 

 

  1. COURSE CONTENT
The course deals with issues related to basic principles and knowledge of the field of Organic Chemistry and specifically analyzes and selects the following subjects:

  1. Organic compounds structure and bonds.
  2. Alkanes, cycloalkanes, and stereochemistry.
  3. Basic spectroscopic methods for the structure determination of organic molecules.
  4. Alkenes: structure, activity, and reactions.
  5. Alkynes: structure, activity, and reactions
  6. Alkyl halides: structure, activity, and reactions.
  7. Conjugated dienes-Benzene and aromaticity.
  8. Chemistry of carbonyl compounds (aldehydes-ketones).
  9. Amines-Acids-Acid derivatives.
  10. Biomolecules: Carbohydrates (mono-, oligo-, polysaccharides)
  11. Biomolecules: Amino Acids-Peptides-Proteins
  12. Biomolecules: Lipids (terpenes, carotenoids, vitamins)
  13. Biomolecules: Nucleic Acids

 

  1. TEACHING AND LEARNING ASSESSMENT METHODS
DELIVERING METHOD In classroom
IT USE §  Powerpoint, videos

§  e-class

 

TEACHING ORGANIZATION Activity Semester workload

 

Lectures 39
Laboratory courses 26
Teamwork 35
Independent study 25
Course total

(25-hour workload per credit unit)

 

125

STUDENT ASSESSMENT

 

In order to pass this course, each student must complete all of the following compulsory requirements:

  • Laboratory evaluation:

Laboratory experiments and reports, oral and written examination in the lab.

  • Theory evaluation:

Formal examination (mid-semester and final written examinations).

 

  1. PROPOSED LITERATURE
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY J.Mc.Murry

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY  David R. Klein