Food Physical Chemistry


  1. GENERAL
SCHOOL AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT
STUDY LEVEL Undergraduate
COURSE CODE FOOD0002 SEMESTER  6th  /8th
COURSE TITLE FOOD PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY
INDEPENDENT TEACHING ACTIVITIES

 

TEACHING HOURS PER WEEK ECTS
Lectures and laboratory course 5 5
COURSE TYPE Specialization
PREREQUISITE COURSE(S):
LANGUAGE (TEACHING AND EXAMS) Greek
THE COURSE IS OFFERED TO ERASMUS STUDENTS NO
COURSE WEBSITE (URL)

 

  1. TEACHING OUTCOMES
Teaching outcomes
The purpose of the course is to understand the physicochemical properties of foods and to study the effect of the physical and chemical processes applied to foods on their maintenance, safety, and quality. Selected topics in food science are studied and combined with laboratory exercises. On successful completion of the course students will be able to:

  1. Develop an understanding of the breadth and concepts of food physical chemistry.
  2. An appreciation of the role of physical chemistry in the food chemical sciences and engineering.
  3. Develop knowledge concerning physical and chemical interactions in foods in terms of physical and chemical principles applied to food systems.
  4. An understanding of the applications of physical/chemical techniques and instrumentation for the study of foods.
  5. Develop an understanding of basic thermodynamic and kinetic concepts, while the current course serves as an introduction to interfacial phenomena, self-assembly of soft matter, colloidal systems, rheology, and the manifestation of such processes to the properties, processing, microbiology, and bioavailability of foods.
  6. Develop the ability to study Greek and English-language research literature either independently or in collaboration (teamwork).
  7. Develop cooperative work with the instructor, with live guidance, in preparation for work.
  8. Develop the ability and ability to present acquired knowledge to both specialist and non-specialist audiences (oral presentation/teamwork support).
General capabilities
§  Independent work

§  Teamwork

§  Literature search, data analysis, and synthesis

§  Development of inductive reasoning

3. COURSE CONTENT

The course involves the study of:

  1. Water activity, the relationship of water with food safety and quality. Kinetics of food reactions. Application: finding out the expected shelf life of food.
  2. Dispersion Systems – Gels – Foams. Emulsions and their stability.
  3. Chemical thermodynamics. Phase balance. Interfacial tension.
  4. Phase transitions. Glassy transition. Crystallization.
  5. Influence of phase shifts on food quality. Food structure.
  6. Viscosity. Rheological – Mechanical – Food viscoelastic properties.
  7. Porosity. Sucking. Diffusion of small molecules into food. Microencapsulation and controlled release of active substances.
  8. Food dehydration procedures. Freeze-drying.
  9. Food production and packaging processes.
  10. Heat treatment, UHT, HTST, Aseptic packaging, Pasteurization, Sterilization.
  11. New Food Production Processes, Food Extrusion.
  12. Preservation of vitamins in foods.
  13. Osmosis.

 

  1. TEACHING AND LEARNING ASSESSMENT METHODS
DELIVERING METHOD In classroom
IT USE §  Powerpoint, videos

§  e-class

 

TEACHING ORGANIZATION Activity Semester workload

 

Lectures 39
Laboratory courses 26
Teamwork 35
Independent study 25
Course total

(25-hour workload per credit unit)

 

125

STUDENT ASSESSMENT

 

In order to pass this course, each student must complete all of the following compulsory requirements:

  • Laboratory evaluation:

Laboratory experiments and reports, oral and written examination in the lab.

  • Theory evaluation:

Formal examination (mid-semester and final written examinations), a literature review assignment (during the semester).

 

  1. PROPOSED LITERATURE
Introduction to the Physical Chemistry of Foods.   Ritzoulis C.